Quiet-List 1997

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RE: Radio in the workplace



Federico,

Thanks for your ideas. Apparently there was an agreement to have quiet 50% 
of the time but the boss overruled it.

The root of the problem seems to be "the majority rules". There is no 
recognition of the fact that the majority has no right to inflict its 
tastes on the minority.

I don't know if it's the same in your part of the world, but in North 
America the prevalent attitude is that "people should be able to do what 
they want." It is a recognition of what I might call active rights, at the 
expense of passive rights -- the right not to be exposed to what you do not 
want to see or hear.

Right now we have a debate in Canada about whether women should be allowed 
to expose their breasts in public. Seeing the "person on the street" 
interviews on TV, I'm struck by the fact that the only reasoning the 
younger interviewees seem able to advance is that "people should be allowed 
to do what they want". I don't want to open up the debate here -- there 
must be another mailing-list for that! -- but I think the prevalence of 
that attitude illustrates the poverty of our thinking about human rights. 
It is exactly the kind of thinking that has given us jet-skis and 
boom-cars.

Peter Donnelly
Right to Quiet Society
http://www.islandnet.com/~skookum/quiet/



----------
From: 	Federico Miyara[SMTP:fmiyara@unrctu.edu.ar]
Reply To: 	quiet-list@igc.org
Sent: 	Thursday, July 03, 1997 6:52 PM
To: 	quiet-list@igc.org
Subject: 	Re: Radio in the workplace

Peter Donnelly,

>I'm sure most list-members will agree that my friend's rights are being
>violated by his being forced to listen to other people's entertainment
>noise,

I guess you're wright.

>but I haven't been able to offer him any practical advice. Is anyone
>aware of any legal precedent establishing a right to quiet in the
>workplace?

I don't know your laws, but I doubt that there exist such an ordinance
protecting workers right to quiet.
I would start by asking if there is a considerable group of workers at that
workplace who are disturbed by the radio. The first measure would be to
gather and request that the radio be off at least in a percentage of the
time equal to that of workers disliking it. That seems to make sense and I
can't find any reasonable argument against it.
The second measure would be to take a radio set and tune to another 
station.
This arises from the supposition that the reason argued to keep the radio 
on
all the time is to entertain or satisfy "the majority", so if anyone has 
the
right to listen to music, why not his/her favorite one? The cacophony thus
generated would put people to think about the issue.
The third measure would be to ask that the music be delivered anyway, but
thru ear plugs or phones. I think it wouldm't be a huge investment to lay
some yards of cable feeding multiple pairs of low-priced phones.

That's all what I can think of now.

Regards.

Federico Miyara


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QUIET-LIST:   Internet Mail List and Forum for discussion of Noise Pollution,
Soundscape Awareness, and the Right to Quiet.     Email: "quiet-list@igc.org"
To subscribe, email "majordomo@igc.org" with message "subscribe quiet-list".
For info, send message "info quiet-list" to same.
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