Sunday, 16 June 2002

Exerpts from BMA Medline database abstracts

Re-vibration disease

Introduction

The following is a selection of abbreviated abstracts found on  the British Medical Association's database (Medline) on the  13th and 14th June 2002. The term "vibration adverse effects" was used to search the database and more than 2,500  headings were retrieved, of this number 300 headings were checked and of  these 30 abstracts are shown below.

The motivation for compiling this information comes from frustration  at the lack of information in the UK public domain. A large number of  people in this country today are exposed to potentially harmful  vibration without the knowledge that some forms of vibration and noise can cause permanent injury.

Further more it is my experience over the past 18 months of trying to  find the cause of my own ill health I have encountered very few medical  people who are prepared at the very least to even acknowledge the  subject of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) and Vibroacoustic disease (VAD).  Let alone to suggest treatment for my symptoms.

I also find it unbelievable that the British medical establishment  seem to know so little about the effects of vibration when there is so  much scientific information from around the globe made available on the  BMA web site. Many other countries over the last five-years, have  successfully implemented preventative measures and their industries are  now reaping the rewards.

In this country the EU Physical Agents (vibration) Directive will  soon be accepted (July 2002) only becoming fully functional by 2014 and even then derogating the whole transport industry from the requirement of monitoring exposure levels. This situation cannot be considered acceptable by any standards of justice. Particularly when most preventative measures are simple and cheap to instigate.

For further information contact, Jonathan Arnot at j.w.arnot@ukgateway.net

 http://sun.bma.org.u k/ovidweb_T/ovidweb.cgi

Accession Number 2002065549

Author: Elsner G.

Institution

Dr. G. Elsner, Institut fur Arbeitsmedizin, Johann Wolfgang Geothe-Universitat, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main; Germany. G.Elsner@em.uni-franfurt.de

Title

Is there an occupational cause for Spondylolysis and  spondylolisthesis?

Source

Zentralblatt fur Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz une Ergonomie.  Vol52(1) (pp2-6), 2002.

Abstract

Reference is made to ten publications dealing with the occupational  frequency of and causes for spondylolisthesis and spondylolysis. Among  then are five published mass health examinations carried out within  particular occupational groups (miners, commercial vehicle drivers).  Based on five cross-sectional studies odd ratios could be calculated as  risk estimator (OR 1.7-4.7) indicating the association of spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis with heavy labour (above all farm work and influence of vibrations). Men are more often affected, but there are also typical women's jobs with high risk. [References: 22]

 

AD

Accession Number 2002022709

Author: Smith SD.

Institution

Dr. S.D. Smith, Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/HECB, 2610 Seventh Street, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7901; United States. Suzanne.smith@wpafb.af.mil

Title

Characterizing the effects of airborne vibration on human body vibration response.

Source

Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. Vol 739(1) (pp 36-45), 2002.

Abstract

Exposure to high intensity, low frequency noise can cause whole-body-vibration. Such exposures to airborne vibration can reach the limits of human tolerance and have been associated with physiological and pathological disorders.

The most significant finding was the occurance of a resonance peak in the fore-aft chest acceleration in the frequency bands between 63 and 100Hz.

Conclusions: The resonance observed in the upper torso strongly suggests that airborne vibration in the 60 to 100Hz frequency band may be an important contributing factor in the generation of subjective symptoms and possibly physiological and pathological disorders.

 

®

Unique Identifier 11521294

Medline Identifier 21412966

Authors: Drobyshev VA. Loseva MI. Sukharevskaia TM. Michurin AI.

Title

[Influence of Low-frequency magnetotherapy and HF-puncture on heart rhythm in hypertensive workers exposed to vibration]. [Russian]

Source

Meditsina Truda I Promyshlennaia Ekologiia. (6):20-3, 2001.

Abstract

The authors present results concerning use of low-frequency magnetic fields and HF-therapy for correction of vegetative homeostasis in workers with variable length of service, exposed to vibration, having early forms of arterial hypertension. The most positive changes of vegetative status and central hemodynamics are seen in workers with low length of service.

 

AF

Unique Identifier 11521293

Medline Identifier 21412965

Authors: Liubchenko PN. Ian'shina EN.

Title

[The status of the vegetative nervous system in vibration disease patients]. [Russian]

Source

Meditsina Truda I Promyshlennaia Ekologiia. (6):15-20, 2001.

Abstract

Vibration disease patients demonstrate severe vegetative disorders of peripheral and supersegmental levels of nervous system, also involved cerebral and cardiovascular structures, and minimal changes in respiratory and digestive systems. Findings are early signs of generalised vegetative disorders showing neurovascular changes both in upper and lower limbs. All vegetative disorders revealed are progressing.

B0

Unique Identifier 11494444

Medline Identifier 21386550

Authors: Tret'iakov SV. Shpagina LA. Samarskaia GN. Shelepova NV. Zheliasniak MS. Kuznetsova GV.

Title

[Aspects of diastolic function of the heart in vibration disease]. [Russian]

Source

 Terapevticheskii Arkhiv. 73(4):34-7, 2001

Abstract

Doppler echocardiography was made to evaluate diastolic function of the heart ventricles in 54 men with vibration disease. Mean exposure to local vibration was 22.4 years.

Conclusion: Patients with vibration disease were diagnosed to have left and right ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

 

B1

Accession Number 2002092811

Authors: Bosco C. Dellisanti F. Fucci A. Tsarpela O. Annino G. Forti C. Giombini A. D'Ottavio S.

Institution

C. Bosco, c/o Societa Stampa Sportiva, Via C. Guinizzelli, 56, 00152 Roma; Italy. c.bosco@quipo.it

Title

The effect of whole body vibration on explosive power, Speed endurance and extensibility of soccer players leg muscles.

Source

Medicina Dello Sport. Vol 54(4) (pp 287-293), 2001. 

Abstract

Conclusions: Thus, the results of the present experiment have shown a concomitant enhancement of both leg extensor power and leg flexor extensibility.

Such enhancement most probably is determined by the petentiation of nervous activity. [References: 29]

 

B2

Unique Identifier 11380538

Medline Identifier 21275343

Authors: Kerchan-Schindl K. Grampp S. Henk C. Resch H. Preisinger E. Fialka-Moser V. Imhof H.

Title

Whole Body Vibration exercise leads to alterations in muscle blood volume.

Source

Clinical Physiology. 21(3):377-82, 2001 May. 

Abstract

Occupationally used high-frequency vibration is supposed to have negative effects on blood flow and muscle strength.

Twenty healthy adults performed a 9-min standing test. They stood with both feet on a platform, producing oscillating mechanical vibrations of 26Hz.

The results indicate that low-frequency vibration does not have the negative effects on peripheral circulation known from occupational high-frequency vibration.

 

B3

Accession Number 2001284169

Authors: Shinozaki T. Yano E. Murata K.

Institution

Dr. E. Yano, Dept. of Hygiene and Public Health, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605; Japan. Eyano@med.teikyo-u.acjp

Title

Intervention for prevention of low back pain in Japanese forklift workers.

Source

American Journal of Industrial Medicine. Vol 40(2) (pp 141-144), 2001.

Abstract

The second intervention (facility approach), which mainly comprised of a reduction in whole body vibration, was subsequently added, and 9 months later the prevalence of low back pain in forklift workers further decreased to 33%.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that the faciity approach is more effective for a reduction of LBP than the personal approach. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [References: 19]

 

B4

Unique Identifier 11548062

Medline Identifier 21430061

Authors: Bochnia M. Dziewiszek W. Kassner J.

Institution

Department of Ortolaryngology, Medical University of Wroclaw, Poland.

Title

Experimental studies of vibratory trauma of Corti's organ. II. Scanning electron microscopy.

Source

 International Journal of Occuptational Medicine & Environmental Health. 14(2): 135-41, 2001.

Abstract

The results of the study demonstrate the harmful effect of mechanical vibration on the inner ear. According to the observed pattern of damage, one can expect an increasing hearing impairment in low and medium frequency range in persons exposed to whole body vibration.

 

B5

Unique Identifier 10735981

Medline Identifier 20200781

Authors: Rittweger J. Beller G. Felsenberg D.

Institution

Institute of Physiology, Freie Universtat Berlin, Arnimallee 22, 14195 Berlin, Germany.

Title

Acute phyiological effects of exhaustive whole body vibration exercise in man.

Source

 Clinical Physiology. 20(2):134-42, 2000 Mar.

Abstract

Vibration exercise (VE) is a new neuromuscular training method which is applied to athletes as well as in prevention and therapy of osteoporosis. The present study explored the physiological mechanisms of fatigue by VE in 37 young healthy subjects.

After VE, voluntary force in knee extension was reduced by 9.2%, jump height by 9.1%, and the decrease of EMG median frequency during maximal voluntary contraction was attenuated.

Surprisingly, an itching erythema was found in about half of the individuals, and an increase in cutaneous blood flow. It follows that exhaustive whole body VE elicits a mild cardiovascular exertion, and that neural as well as muscular mechanisms of fatigue may play a role.

 

ACAC  

Unique Identifier 10810108

Medline Identifier 20271779

Authors: Palmer KT. Griffin MJ. Bendall H. Pannet B. Coggon D.

Institution

MRC Environmental Epidemiology Unit, Community Clinical Sciences, University of Southampton, Uk.ktp@mrc.soton.ac.uk

Title

Prevalence and pattern of occupational exposure to whole body vibration in Great Britain: findings from a national survey.

Source

Occuaptaional & Environmental Medicine. 57(4):229-36, 2000 Apr. 

Abstract

Results: From the 12,907 responses it was estimated that 7.2 million men and 1.8 million women in Great Britain are exposed to WBV at work in a 1 week period if the occupational use of cars, vans, buses, trains, and motor cycles is included in within the definition of exposure. The eVDV of .374,000 men and 9000 women was estimated to exceed exposures most often exceeded 15 ms(-1.75). Occupations in which the exposures most often exceeded 15 ms(-1.75) included forklift truck drivers, farm owners and managers, farm workers, and drivers of road goods vehicles.

The highest estimated median occupational eVDVs were found in forklift truck drivers, drivers of road goods vehicles, bus and coach drivers, and technical and wholesales sales representatives

The commonest occupational sources of WBV and occupations with particularly high exposures have been identified, providing a basis for targeting future control activities.

 

Note from document compiler: Shipping and RO-RO high-speed ferry crews are not counted.

 

ACAD

Unique Identifier 10774867

Medline Identifier 20234900

Authors: Bosco C. Iacovelli M. Tsarpela O. Cardinale M. Tihanyi J. Viru M. De Lorenzo A. Viru A.

Institution

Societa Stampa Sportiva, Rome, Italy. c.bosco@quipo.it

Title

Hormonal responses to whole body vibration in men.

Source

European Journal of Applied Physiology. 81(6):449-54, 2000 Apr. 

Abstract

Fourteen male subjects [mean (SD) age 25 (4.6) years] were exposed to verticle sinusoidal WBV, 10 times for 60 s with 60 s rest between the vibration sets (a rest period lasting 6 min was allowed after 5 vibration sets).

Blood samples were also collected, and plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol (C) were measured. The results showed a significant increase in plasma concentration of T and GH, whereas C levels decreased.

Neuromuscular efficiency improved, as indicated by the decrease in the ratio between EMGrms and power. Jumping performance, which was measured using the counter-movement jump test, was also enhanced. This it can be argued that the biological mechanism produced by vibration is similar to the effect produced by explosive power training (jumping and bouncing).

In conclusion, it is suggested that WBV influences proprioceptive feedback mechanisms and specific neural components, leading to an improvement of neuromuscular performance.

 

AC®

Unique Identifier 10189154

Medline Identifier 99203037

Authors: Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Occupational Medicine Research Centre, Lisbon, Protugal.

Title

The clinical stages of vibroacoustic disease.

Source

 Aviation Space & Evironmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2): A32-9, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Background: Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is an occupational disease occurring in suscetible workers who have had long-term exposure (> or 10 yr) to large pressure amplitude (> or 90dB SPL) and low frequency noise (< or 500 Hz). The clinical progression in insidious, and lesions are found in many systems throughout the body. Some of the findings, such as extracellular matrix changes, appear to be specific to this disease. Others, such as cognitive impairment, seem to be common in different types of stress-induced pathology.

We analysed the files of 140 patients with VAD, paying close attention to the chronology of the clinical findings, the registry of eventual and on-the-job accidents, and the evaluation of disabilities.

Results: We have classified VAD in function of the time it took for 50% of the population to acquire the relevant sign or symptom. Stage 1, mild signs (behavioural and mood associated with repeated infections of the respiratory tract, e.g., bronchitis); Stage 2, moderate signs (depression and aggressiveness, pericardial thickening and other extracellular matrix changes, light to moderate hearing impairment, discrete neurovascular disorders); Stage 3, severe signs (myocardial infarction, stroke, malignancy, epilepsy, and suicide).

Conclusion: This classification should be capable of assessing work fitness, and is a primary approach to a complex and multidisciplinary problem with implication in diagnosis, prevention and disability compensation within VAD.

 

 

ACAF

Unique Identifier 10189153

Medline Identifier 99203036

Authors: Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Occupational Medicine Research Centre, Lisbon, Portugal.

Title

A unique case of vibracoustic disease: a tribute to an extraordinary patient.

Source

Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A27-31, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

This paper describes the case of a patient, Mr A, who died in 1987. The information provided by Mr A in life, and his insistence on making a will demanding an autopsy on his death, has given us invaluable data on Vibroacoustic Disease (VAD). Mr A was an intellectually curious man who researched the medical literature related to his condition, and compared it to his own experience. He would describe all his sensations during his many epileptic seizures. Solely because of the results of Mr A's autopsy, new avenues of research were initiated. These have led to new concepts and exciting new perspectives on noise-induced extra-aural pathology.

VAD is today a well-established and easily diagnosed entity.

 

ACB0

Unique Identifier 10189168

Medline Identifier 99203051

Authors: Martinho Pimenta AJ. Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Occupational Medicine Research Centre, Lisbon, Portugal.

Title

Epilepsy in the vibroacoustic disease: a case report.

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A122-7, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Introduction: Late-onset epilepsy was one of the first neurological problems identified in patients diagnosed with vibroacoustic disease. Other clinical situations, such as automatisms and rage-like reaction crises were also observed. Some cases of epileptic seizures were triggered by different types of stimuli.

Case report: This study describes the clinical case of a 30 year old male metal worker who had epileptic seizures when he used vibrating tools common to his profession, such as drills and sanders.

Brain MRI of this subject revealed multiple hyperintense focal lesions in the sub-cortical white matter. Echocardiography revealed thickening of the pericardium and valve structures.

Commentary: To the author's knowledge, this is the first documented case of reflex epilepsy due to vibration stimuli. We briefly discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms of this clinical event.

 

ACB1

Unique Identifier 10189165

Medline Identifier 99203048

Authors: Pimenta MG. Martinho Pimenta AJ. Castelo Branco MS. Silva Simoes JM. Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Department of Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal.

Title

ERP P300 and brain magnetic resonance imaging in patients with vibroacoustic disease.

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A107-14, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Introduction: Subjects occupationally exposed to large pressure amplitude (> Or 90dB SPL) and low frequency (< or 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise for long term periods (> 10 years) can develop vibracoustic disease (VAD). One of the earliest complaints of VAD patients deals with memory and attention disturbances. On the other hand, in over 50% of these patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the CNS revealed cortical atrophy and dilation of the perivasular spaces, and small hypertense lesions in T2 of the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, and brainstem.

Methods: Sixty aeronautical workers with more than 10 years of LPALF noise exposure were studied using brain MRI and ERP P300.

Results: The neurological examination revealed abnormalities in 80%, the most common finding being the archaic palmo-mental reflex. Some 37 subjects had hypertense foci in T2 of the subcortical and periventricular white matter, basal ganglia and the brainstem. Comparing the ERP P300 amplitude and latency values, morphology and topography, obtained in these 37 subjects with data from the 23 who did not have any morphological changes in CNS, we found a strong correlation between the brain MRI lesions and the neurophysiological changes (p<0.01).

Conclusions: These results are important for understanding the pathophysiology of the cgnitive impairment found in VAD patients.

 

ACB2

Unique Identifier 10189164

Medline Identifier 99203047

Authors: Martinho Pimenta AJ. Castelo Branco MS. Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Santo Antinio dos Capuchos Hospital, Lisbon, Protugal.

Title

The palmo-mental reflex in vibroacoustic disease.

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A100-6, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Background: Vibroacoustic disease (VAD), is a multisystemic nosological entity, caused by occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. The most common neurological finding in patients with VAD is the palmomental reflex (PMR). The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of this primitive reflex in a population of VAD patients.

Methods: Sixty individuals, occupationally exposed to LPALF noise underwent a neurological examination. In each one, unilateral contraction of the chin muscles was triggered through the stimulation of the thenar eminence.

Results: Thirty individuals presented unilateral or bilateral PMR; 26 of these presented changes in the brain MRI. EMG measurement evidenced continuous contraction of the chin muscles, without visible PMR, triggered by the stimulation of the thenar eminence.

Conclusion: PMR is present in 50% of patients with VAD. In the VAD patients, the frequency of abnormal chin muscle activity is higher that the frequency of PMR and represents a loss of the cortical control over the brainstem structures.

 

ACB3

Unique Identifier 10189173

Medline Identifier 99203056

Authors: Castelo Branco NA. Rodriguez E. Alves-Pereira M. Jones DR.

Institution

Occupational Medicine Research Centre, Lisbon, Portugal.

Title

Vibroacoustic disease: some forensic aspects.

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A145-51, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is an insidious environmental entity caused by occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude and low frequency (LPALF) noise (> or 90 dB SPL, < or 500 Hz). Significant disabilities may result, and issues of worker's compansation should be openly discussed and settled.

We reviewed the medical files of 236 male caucasians 85who had been diagnosed with VAD and monitored for at least 15 years. The natural history of the disorder was studied in detail, emphasising the clinical diagnostic criteria and the outcoome of disabilities.

Results: Among the 236 cases, 172 (73%) were disabled after an average of 24 years (SD 6.9) of occupational exposure. The primary categories of disabilities were neurological (81,34%), malignant (28, 11.9%), psychiatric (23, 9.7%), cardiovascular (16, 6.8%), and osteoarticular (14, 5.9%). After the onset of exposure to LPALF noise, the minimum time for these disabilities to manifest themselves was 16 years. The most serious complication was multiple attempted suicide. Such attempts were fortunately rare 95, 2.1%) and successful only once.

Echocardiograms showed characteristic changes in pericardial structures, involving proliferation of the extracellular matrix, lack of cilia and five pericardial layers instead of three. This has been studied in pericardial biopsy material obtained during coronary bypass surgery for coronary insufficiency (6 cases), and by autopsy (4 cases).

Discussion: These findings appear to be pathognomonic for the VAD, and the echocardiogram has been confirmed as a fundamental diagnostic tool. The degree of disability due to VAD can be determined from Portugese national disability tables, which cover almost all of the VAD-induced disabilities.

 

ACB4

Unique Identifier 10189156

Medline Identifier 99203039

Authors: Marciniak W. Rodriguez E. Olszowska K. Atkov O. Botvin I. Araujo A. Pais F. Soares Ribeiro C. Bordalo A. Loureiro J. Prazeres De Sa E. Ferreira D. Castelo Branco MS. Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Cardiology Department, Central Hospital of Military School, Warsaw, Poland.

Title

Echocardiographic evaluation in 485 aeronautical workers exposed to different noise environments.

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A46-53, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Introduction: Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a heterogeneous and systemic entity, caused by long term (> or 10 yr) exposure to noise environments characterised by large pressure amplitude and low frequency (LPALF) (. Or 90dB SPL, < or 500Hz), and not explained by other possible etiological agents.

At total of 485 men were divided into 3 noise groups: no noise (< or 70dB), n 48 (group 1); moderate noise exposure, (>70dB and <90dB), n 113 (group 2); and intense noise exposure (> or 90dB), n 324 (group 3).

Result: All evaluated parameters were statistically significantly different in group 1 vs group 3, except flow velocity E. Comparison of group 1 vs group 2 revealed statistically significant differences in mitral, aortic, tricuspid and pericardial thickening, with the strongest evidence for mitral and pericardial structures.

Conclusions: This confirms the results of previous studies. Occupational exposure to noise environments characterised by LPALF noise causes structural changes in the heart. Mitral valve and pericardial thickening constitute the first signs of VAD.

 

B5B5

Unique Identifier 10189157

Medline Identifier 99203040

Authors: Castelo Branco NA. Aguas Ap. Sousa Pereira A. Monteiro E. Fragata JL. Tavares F.

Grande NR.

Institution

Occupational Research Centre, Lisbon, Portugal. 

Title

The Human pericardium in vibroacoustic disease.

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A154-62, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Introduction: One of the main features of vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is the proliferation of the extra-cellular matrix which induces cardiovascular morphological and dynamic changes, and has been evaluated through echo-Doppler. While all subjects exposed to large pressure amplitude (> or 90dB) and low frequency (< or 500 Hz) (LPALF) for at least 15 yr have thickening of some cardiac structure, most frequently the pericardium, no significant diastolic changes accompany these observations. Echocardiography has become the diagnostic method of choice for the VAD.

Conclusion: These features may partially explain why no important diastolic changes are observed in VAD patients in spite of the pericardium thickening.

 

ADAC

Unique Identifier 10189158

Medline Identifier 99203041

Authors: Reis Ferreira JM. Couto AR. Jalles-Tavares N. Castelo Branco MS. Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Portugese Air Force Hospital, Lisbon.

Title

Airway flow limitation in patients with vibroacoustic disease. 

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A63-9, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Introduction: Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a pathology caused by occupational exposure to 85(LPALF) and has been the object of study by this group for the past 20 yr. In a group of 140 VAD-diagnosed patients, 7 non-smoker aircraft technicians developed clinical signs of respiratory insufficiency at an early age.

Conclusion: High resolution CT scan is a valuable tool for diagnosis of lung fibrosis in VAD patients who have symptoms of airway flow limitations. The fact that lung ventilation tests did not present significant changes between both groups is in agreement with findings in Wistar rats. This strongly suggests that a process of focal pulmonary fibrosis may be induced by occupational noise expposure, and is a feature of VAD.

 

ADAD

Unique Identifier 10189162

Medline Identifier 99203045

Authors: Martinho Pimenta AJ. Castelo Branco NA.

Institution

Santo Antonio dos Capuchos Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal. 

Title

Neurological aspects of vibroacoustic disease. 

Source

 Aviation Space & Environmental Medicine. 70(3 Pt 2):A91-5, 1999 Mar.

Abstract

Introduction: Mood and behavioural abnormalities are the most common early finding related to vibroacoustic disease (VAD). Other signs and symptoms have been observed in VAD patients. Brain MRI discloses small multifocal lesions in about 50% of subjects with more than 10 yr of occupational exposure to 85(LPALF) noise.

Methods: The 60 male Caucasians diagnosed with VAD were neurologically evaluated in extreme detail in order to systematically identify the most common and significant neurological disturbances in VAD. Results: This population demonstrates cognitive changes (identified through psychological and neurophysiological studies (ERP P300), vertigo and auditory changes, visual impairment, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Neurological examination reveals pathological signs underlying the multifocal hyperintensities in T2 MR imaging, with predominant involvement of small arteries of the white matter, is probably the visible organic substratum of the neurological picture. However, other pathophyisological mechanisms are involved in epileptic symtomatology.

 

AD®

Unique Identifier 10476674

Medline Identifier 99405589

Authors: Sova SH.

Title

[Periperal autonomic insufficiency in workers who sustain the chronic effect of an occupational vibration-noise factor]. [Ukrainian]

Source

Likarska Sprava. (4):165-8,1999 Jun.

Abstract

The development was studied of vegetative disorders in workers under chronic exposure to occupational vibration and noise. In the workmen, the segmentary apparatus of the vegetative nervous system (VNS) gets affected, with the peripheral vegetative insufficiency syndrome being developed. During the early stages of occupational contact with vibronoise factor there develops an affection of sympathetic portion of VNS but the longer the service duration the greater is the share of parasympathetic disorders.

 AD AF

Unique Identifier 10424068

Medline Identifier 99352867

Authors: Sova SH. Shapovalova VA. Korshak VM.

Title

[The effect of the vibration and noise factor on the physical work capacity and autonomic nervous system function of workers in vibration-hazardous jobs]. [Ukrainian]

Source

 Likarska Sprava. (2):135-8,1999 Mar.

Abstract

An unexampled study was made of the peripheral vegetative incompetence syndrome developing in vibration disease. It is shown that chronic occupational exposure to vibration and noise results in damage to the segementary apparatus of the vegetative nervous system. Vegatative inadequacies are manifested by impairment of cardiovascular functions. With exposure to vibration and noise, it is the sympathetic portion of the vegetative nervous system that is first affected. The service duration-related progression of the pathological process results in increase of the share of parasympathetic pathology. A change in vegetative regulation adversely affects physical performance in those workers who have come to be exposed to a vibronoise factor over long periods of time.

 

ADB0

Unique Identifier 10474940

Medline Identifier 99404188

Authors: Sova SH.

Title

[The effect of local vibration on central and cerebral hemodynamics]. [Ukrainian]

Source

Likarska Sprava. (3):68-71,1999 Apr-May.

Abstract

It is shown that 68.9% of those workers under chronic exposure to industrial vibration and noise have hyperkinetic-type blood circulation, 21.3% eukinetic, 9.8% hypokinetic type. Besides, workers exhibit diminution in general cerebral bloodflow presenting with spastic states of great and small arterial vessels. There is noted a length of service-related increase in percentage of persons presenting with eu- and hypokinetic types of circulation and advancing diminution in general cerebral bloodflow with progression of spasm of arterial vessels being recordable. Antagonists of short-action calcium channels have a beneficial effect oon central and cerebral hemodynamics.

 

ADB1

Unique Identifier 10526480

Medline Identifier 99455400

Authors: Dmitruk LI. Liubchenko PN. Murashko LM. Tichenina RS. Furtseva LN. Podobedova LI. Marchenko VA. Minchenko BI. Vereshchagina VM.

Title

[X-Ray densitometry and biochemical parameters of bone tissue metabloism in patients with vibration disease]. [Russian]

Source

Meditsina Truda I Promyshlennaia Ekologiia. (9):35-8, 1999. 

Abstract

The vibration disease patients appeared to have the most frequent and marked osteoporosis in peripheral bones--hands (in 90% of cases) and forearms (in 66.7%). Prevalence of systemic osteoporosis and osteopenia reached 11.7 and 48.3% in the select respectively. According to biochemical markers, bone reconstruction state was characterised by moderately intensified bone resorption and diminished bone formation.

ADB2

Unique Identifier 9827403

Medline Identifier 99044652

Authors: Noel B.

Institution

Division d'Hypertension et de Medecine Vasculaire, Centre Hospitalier Iniversitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Suisse.

Title

[The vibration syndrome]. [Review][59 refs][French]

Source

Journal des Maladies Vasculaires. 23(4):251-6, 1998 Oct. 

Abstract

The vibration syndrome is an often unrecognised occuptaional neurovascular disease with a prevalence of more than 70% in certain high-risk occupations. Early recognition is crucial because continued exposure to vibration can lead to irreversible ischemic injury and loss of digits.

Demyelinating neuropathy and carpal tunnel syndrome are often associated. Many pathophysiological mechanisms are implicated: hyperactivity of central sympathetic nervous system, release of plasma endothelin-1 and loss of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide vasoregulation.

 

ADB3

Unique Identifier 9491686

Medline Identifier 98152386

Authors: Grechovskaia NV.  

Title

[The impact of working conditions on morbidity in workers in jobs hazardous for vibration and noise in aviation enterprises]. [Russian]

Source

Likarska Sprava. (5):20-3, 1997 Sep-Oct. 

Abstract

A whole complex of hygenic investigations was carried out, involving those designed to study labour conditions, pathopsychological testing of 103 assemblers--fitters, analysis of quality of changes in vegetative nervous system, level of constitutional and reactive anxiety, routine clinical and instrumental examination. There has been disclosed high level of vegetative dysfunction's during the early stage unspecific disorders presenting as psychovegetative syndrome, vegetative-vascular-trophic syndrome, cerebral angiodystonic syndrome. It is suggested that the above syndromes be regarded as early unspecific signs of the development of vibronoise pathology during the early stages of its development. It is recommended that quality of the vegetative nervous system should be considered in advising the workers on the choice of vocation in which health hazards from exposure to vibration and noise exist.

A0

ADB4

Unique Identifier 7973491

Medline Identifier 95063758

Authors: Nilsson T. Hagberg M. Burstrom L. Kihlberg S.

Institution

Department of Occuaptaional Medicine, Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden. 

Title

Impaired nerve conduction in the carpal tunnel of platers and truck assemblers exposed to hand-arm vibration. 

Source

Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 20(3):189-99, 1994 Jun. 

Abstract

Conclusions: The contributions from vibration and ergonomic factors to impaired nerve conduction velocity were inseparable in this study. Ergonomic factors such as forceful gripping and extreme positions, apart from vibration exposure, may be strong determinants of impaired nerve conduction in the carpal tunnel area.

 

B5 B5 B5

Unique Identifier 8815978

Medline Identifier 96412629

Authors: Necking LE. Lundstrom R. Lundborg G. Thornell LE. Friden J.

Institution

Department of Hand Surgery, Malmo University Hospital, Lund University, Sweden.

Title

Skeletal muscule changes after short term Vibration.

Source

Scandinavian Journal of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery & Hand Surgery. 30(2):99-103, 1996 Jun.

Abstract

The percentage of centrally located nuclei was significantly increased after vibration. This study shows that short term vibration can induce changes in size in muscle fibres. We postulate that this is the first indication of a vibration-induced muscle injury that may develop into chronic impairment of muscle function if the exposure continues for an extended period of time.